Fingerboard radius options for vintage series necks.

MFTech

New member
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18
If Warmoth offered the vintage neck in a 9.5" radius (or flatter), bet they would sell a lot of them.    The vintage modern is great, but then you get the 22 fret overhang...  Fender custom shop started offering vintage series guitars with 9.5" radius & 6105s... hugely popular.
 

jackthehack

Senior member
Messages
5,630
Order the Vintage Modern neck with 9.5 or whatever radius.
Pull 22nd fret - if you ask when ordering they could probably omit installation of such.
Trim off overhanging fret extention.
Voila! Problem solved.
 

MFTech

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18
It's not something Warmoth is setup to do...  I've trimmed a few down, but 22nd fret slot is a bit within the edge.    To make it look right, you have to fill the slot, or round over the edge a bit.      Overall it's a minor issue, but would make a nice option. 
 

tfarny

Senior member
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4,481
I don't think Warmoth is the place to go for people who really want to recreate some 50's dinosaur guitar. I mean as long as you're making your own guitar, why not have the 22nd fret? If I had unlimited money and a desire to make exact copies of 1950s guitars I'd go to Fender custom shop, but if I want to make an axe that is 1) unique 2) better than those old designs and 3) an exercise in creativity, I'll go with Warmoth. There's no question that those old guitars have mojo and they were usually made of really good wood that is rare these days, but engineering-wise, what's the point in worshipping the old ways? Give me compound radius, heel contour, etc. any day. Besides, these W guitars have no resale value, so the 'vintage collector' / investor isn't interested in them either.
 

arkivel

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21
I can't for the life of me understand why Warmoth doesn't offer a 9.5 radius on the vintage series necks. Of course people would eat them up. The vintage craze is hugely popular right now and all the custom shop vintage strats and mexican vintage player's strats offer them. To suggest that only "vintage collectors" or "investors" would be interested in anything vintage series is ridiculous. Of course theres a market for a vintage neck with a 9.5 radius. That's a Fender demographic fretboard radius. Have we not noticed what's selling these days?

I think the problem here is that Warmoth has an extremely myopic view of the guitar market and they don't know how to or care whether or not if they increase their market share. I almost sense an elitist attitude as well. How else can you explain a company that stubbornly tells it's customers that nitrocellulose finishes are unnecessary when they are extremely popular, and doesn't offer a 9.5" radius on a vintage series neck when so many are obviously clamouring for them. someone needs to tell them that this isn't 1989! Some guitar players have an appreciation for simple appointments and hardware. Not everyone wants a big clunky Floyd Rose or a dual action truss rod. Those technically superior modern appointments DO affect tone.

IMO Warmoth makes very high quality products, but they don't know how to market their products and they don't serve the Fender crowd well enough. The Fender crowd wants vintage appointments with modern tolerances. If Warmoth is a custom outfit they should offer BASIC CUSTOM options such as a flat radius on all their necks. They should also strongly consider nitro paint.
 

tfarny

Senior member
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4,481
That's an oddly vehement post for a noob. You can get a 9.5 radius on the vintage modern neck, btw, in fact you can get a non-compound radius of any type on the warmoth pro and the vintage modern. Shall I quote the myopic ones?

Custom Straight Radius
Straight radius necks have been the industry standard since the inception of guitars and are still used by the majority of manufactures; primarily because it is much easier to produce than the much more comfortable compound radius necks. For those of who prefer straight radius, we have a custom machine which is adjustable to any straight radius between 9" and 16", in half inch increments. We can offer this custom work on our Warmoth "Pro" and Vintage Modern construction necks, in either 25 1/2" or 24 3/4" scale lengths.

Finally, Warmoth's description of it's 'total vintage' necks:

Total Vintage Construction
For those desiring a close replica of the early vintage Fender necks, this is it. We have duplicated both the dimensions and construction methods used in the mid to late 50's.

TRUSS ROD DESIGN:

The truss rod in these vintage necks is the same as found in the vintage Fender necks, a single rod anchored at either end, curving over an arch within the neck. This design has functioned successfully in millions of necks though does usually require seasonal adjustment for optimum action. In the all maple necks you will find the expected skunk stripe. In necks with rosewood fingerboards the truss rod is installed under the fingerboard so there is no skunk stripe.

TRUSS ROD ADJUSTMENT:

The only truss rod access is through the heel of the neck. Yes, it's necessary to loosen the neck mounting screws to gain access to this adjustment.

FINGERBOARD RADIUS:

The vintage radius is 7 1/4", very rounded. This is a very comfortable radius for rhythm playing as well as chording though it is pretty limiting for any string bending. There are 21 frets.

So there's only one missing piece, 'total vintage' 9.5 necks, which would recreate nothing as the really old guitars had 7.25.

                          It's also my understanding that they have more business than they know what to do with and are in the process of hiring and expanding. And anyhow they're just a necks-and-bodies company, you can order their parts and get a nitro finish anywhere, it doesn't stop anybody from making whatever they want. Nitro is really toxic and environmentally not good, maybe that's the reason, who cares? Doesn't make much sense to call them elitist for not offering expensive finishes.
 

arkivel

New member
Messages
21
Why do I want a vintage modern neck on my 57 reissue strat? It stands out like a sore thumb with 22 frets and the truss rod
adjuster located at the head. Personally I don't understand the purpose of the vintage modern at all.

Obviously I'm frustrated because it is impossible to find a decent quality total vintage neck with a 9.5 radius. I'd simply buy a vintage RI or hotrod Fender neck, if they offered one without a chunky or V profile and a 9.5 radius, but they don't. At least not on any guitar under 5k.

Again, I don't understand why Warmoth caters mostly to one guitar demographic.
 

Xplorervoodoo

Senior member
Messages
984
arkivel said:
Again, I don't understand why Warmoth caters mostly to one guitar demographic.

I disagree with this statement.  I think Warmoth caters to a wide variety of people and tastes, and I also think they offer an amazing amount of options.  That should be apparent on their website.  By the looks of things, they try very hard to please just about everybody.
 

chuck7

Senior member
Messages
319
The paint options alone disprove the idea that they cater to one type of guitarist.  You can get anything from unfinished, to light burst, to a freaking sparkle blue!  My 5 year old happens to prefer the sparkle ones...

As was stated before, Warmoth has more business than they know what to do with.  I personally am on the far end of a 12 week wait for my parts.  Its just business.  If you are getting more orders than you can handle with the options you offer, you don't need to add more options.  That doesn't make you an elitist.  It makes you a successful business man. 

Sure, they could start offering every single custom option you could imagine, and they could sell them for the prices they sell now, and they could go out of business because their costs and time lines would sore out of control. 
 

jimh

Senior member
Messages
1,344
chuck7 said:
Sure, they could start offering every single custom option you could imagine, and they could sell them for the prices they sell now, and they could go out of business because their costs and time lines would sore out of control. 

Here here.  Good shout Chuck.
 

arkivel

New member
Messages
21
tfarny said:
I don't think Warmoth is the place to go for people who really want to recreate some 50's dinosaur guitar. I mean as long as you're making your own guitar, why not have the 22nd fret? If I had unlimited money and a desire to make exact copies of 1950s guitars I'd go to Fender custom shop, but if I want to make an axe that is 1) unique 2) better than those old designs and 3) an exercise in creativity, I'll go with Warmoth. There's no question that those old guitars have mojo and they were usually made of really good wood that is rare these days, but engineering-wise, what's the point in worshipping the old ways? Give me compound radius, heel contour, etc. any day. Besides, these W guitars have no resale value, so the 'vintage collector' / investor isn't interested in them either.

Sorry, don't mean to single you out, but I think this perfectly illustrates the attitude towards vintage stuff. "50's dinosaur guitar", "better than those old designs". "engineering-wise, what's the point in worshipping the old ways" That's not elitist? Come on.

As far as someone suggesting that "too many options would bankrupt Warmoth", that's bunk. Warmoth isn't exactly a regular production line. They offer customization on all necks and bodies. The only difference with vintage necks is that they have a jig set up to radius the neck and cut the frets at the same time. It's just a manufacturing decision that was probably made years ago before the current trend for a flatter radius vintage neck. The other neck series are radiused and fret slotted individually by different machines so they are are entirely capable of doing this for a vintage neck. Of course there is a cost increase for a custom radius neck, but Warmoth passes that on to the customer. So they aren't losing money for that option and it's certainly not bankrupting them.

Warmoth could quite easily make a monthly or special run of 9.5 radius total vintage necks and await the final custom CNC manufacturing process like they do for all their other neck series. Considering the unavailability of such a feature elsewhere in the marketplace, and the current demand for such, they would easily sell out.
 

tfarny

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4,481
I don't understand what you're getting at. I don't really personally care about realistic copies of vintage guitars (especially relics), so I'm an 'elitist'? I just don't get it. The company makes a huge range of stuff, you're just mad because they don't make the one thing you've set your heart on. There's plenty of other companies that will sell you what you want - USACG will make exactly what you've spent all your posts complaining about, at prices similar to Warmoth. Go there and buy it and let me not care about vintage guitars in peace, please.
 

arkivel

New member
Messages
21
If you don't care about total vintage necks then why are you posting in this thread and telling us how inferior they are? I really don't like compound radius fretboards or contoured heels, but I don't go out of my way to tell people they are garbage, or beneath me. I'm not snubbing anyone's preference. If you like modern techy guitar stuff that's fine by me.

As far as I can tell USACG isn't a licensed Fender manufacturer and their headstock shape differs. All the other custom outfits have major quality issues. As far as can tell it's Warmoth or a luthier.
 

jackthehack

Senior member
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5,630
What's with some you people? Have you ever PLAYED a 7.5" radius neck? If not, there are several models of Fender Custom Shop axes or the cheaper "50's" Strat/Tele re-issues at Guitar Center or similar outlet. Maybe I'm just not as sensitive as some people to neck radius and/or my first Fenders were old enough to come with 7.5" radius, but to me there's not that huge a difference between that and a 9.5" radius, go play one and try.

Quit yer whining! This thread is making me tired...  Here are your options:

1.) Learn to love the 7.5" radius
2.) Save up your money and get ripped off on the stupid Fender Custom Shop model
3.) Buy a Vintage Modern neck with a 9.5" radius and a couple of tools and lose the 22nd fret.
4.) I wouldn't wish USACG parts even on you, you can order a neck custom from Musickraft, pay more money for wood that probably won't be up to Warmoth quality, wait longer to get and hassle with sanding a partial degree off the bottom of the neck butt to get the angle to work right in a Warmoth body.
 

Kostas

Senior member
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1,380
arkivel said:
... As far as I can tell USACG isn't a licensed Fender manufacturer and their headstock shape differs...

From USACG site: "We offer custom peghead shapes, either programmed into our CNC for multiple neck orders or individually hand cut"

jackthehack said:
4.) I wouldn't wish USACG parts even on you, you can order a neck custom from Musickraft, pay more money for wood that probably won't be up to Warmoth quality, wait longer to get and hassle with sanding a partial degree off the bottom of the neck butt to get the angle to work right in a Warmoth body.

What's wrong with their quality and why Musickraft is better?
 

jackthehack

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5,630
"What's wrong with their quality and why Musickraft is better?"

Order some parts from USACG and you'll see. Most of the wood they use wouldn't pass Warmoth QA for their "bargain basement". Try using one of their necks as a replacement for a Fender and check the neck pocket fit. I've been unimpressed.

Musickraft offers some options that you can't get from Warmoth, that would fit the OP's wish list, I've used them mainly to get '57 Strat style hard "boat" V back contour with a 7.5" radius unavailable from Warmoth for some specialized builds and a neck replacement. As I indicated, you will pay more for the same quality wood, have a longer wait time, and have to rework the butt of the neck a little as their neck pockets are a partial degree off.
 

Kostas

Senior member
Messages
1,380
I have read only but the best about USACG, especially on their necks and their (thin) finishes. I wanted to try their products but their lack of wood made me decide against. They use mostly the "traditional" woods that I'm not interested when it comes to necks.

About neck pockets: I have a Fender strat body and both Warmoth necks I have are slightly loose with this. I'm wondering if I 'll ever find a neck with a tight fit like they fit in the Warmoth bodies. I'm hesitant to order a Warmoth neck for this body.

On the original subject: I don't care for vintage correct instruments, relics etc but I understand those who like 'em. My biggest complain of Warmoth is the lack of options for the Vintage Modern necks. I have three Warmoth bodies sitting at home and I know I have to pay extra for woods that I wouldn't pay extra if I was ordering a Pro neck. I did it once but I hate to do it again so I'm waiting for new options.
 

jackthehack

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5,630
"My biggest complain of Warmoth is the lack of options for the Vintage Modern necks. I have three Warmoth bodies sitting at home and I know I have to pay extra for woods that I wouldn't pay extra if I was ordering a Pro neck. I did it once but I hate to do it again so I'm waiting for new options."

Which options are you referring to?
 
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