Favorite neck woods?

DuckBaloo

Senior member
Messages
300
I thought tru oil was mineral oil. I've never done anything to my boards but it seems like a lot of people around here condition regularly. Just trying to figure out what to do.

Tru Oil is polymerized linseed oil, it is a wipe-on varnish that dries into a hard lacquer-like finish.

Food-grade mineral oil is commonly used for rosewood (and similar) fretboards, it is also sold a butcher block oil or bore oil (for wind instruments). You should only have to condition a fretboard once per several years (about 5 years for me). There is such thing as too much.
 
Last edited:

cromulent

Senior member
Messages
265
cant wait to see it
me neither! I imagine it will look a bit like this:

I've got a ziricote board on my baritone canary neck and love it. Similar feel to ebony and very attractive grain. What's not to like?
I'd say ebony and ziricote are my two favorite fretboard woods.
As far a neck meat there's lots of good options. My favorite three that I've tried are bubinga, roasted maple, and canary. I also have a wenge and a goncalo and I've played a rosewood; these have a waxier feel to me and personally I like the "dryer" feeling woods.

HwT0gsZ.jpg
 

rauchman

Senior member
Messages
795
Wow, that's stunning. The grain of the fretboard almost look like they merge with the grain lines of the shaft wood. Beautiful!
 

cromulent

Senior member
Messages
265
Wow, that's stunning. The grain of the fretboard almost look like they merge with the grain lines of the shaft wood. Beautiful!
I know, right? I don't know if they could have intentionally done this before sanding down the headstock to meet the fretboard, but it came out quite nicely indeed.
 

Rick

Senior member
Messages
4,541
When it comes to matching the fretboard to the neck warmoth does a good matching job. At least on mine. They definitely plan it to make it look right
 

bruzanhd

Senior member
Messages
182
When it comes to matching the fretboard to the neck warmoth does a good matching job. At least on mine. They definitely plan it to make it look right
Warmoth generally picks excellent looking grain patterns and orientations when possible. Tops, fretboards, even orienting slabs of wood for neck shafts or body blanks is usually done tastefully at warmoth.
 
Top