Tune-o-matic Abr vs Nashville vs metric

ragamuffin

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1,008
For my next build I’m going to be using a t.o.m. type bridge. Being that I will be drilling the holes and installing the studs myself, is there any reason to choose an Abr over a Nashville or metric?

I’m thinking I want to use the Tonepros TP6A which is a Nashville style made of aluminum with brass saddles vs the standard zinc construction. Any advice for or against this?
 

TBurst Std

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2,664
1. Don’t go metric

Next, and speaking from the aspect of my 79 LP:

Of course it was Nashville. Yes I did have issues getting the break over angle equal to that of the neck (nut to tuners specifically).

I upgraded to the RS Nashville conversion to ABR. No issues and the guitar plays and sounds better.  Maybe it’s matching the angles, maybe it’s just a better quality part.

All I know is, why not ABR? Why choose Nashville or metric instead? The only thing I could think of is of there’s not enough adjustment in the ABR to intonate, then the Nashville offers an advantage. But then that suggests something is miss-located.
 

TBurst Std

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Oh and a sidebar, even though I couldn’t get to the break over angle I desired, I collapsed 3 Nashville bridges over 3 decades. 
The Callaham part is a strong ABR, and has been great for over a decade.  More than I can say for any name brand Nashville style bridge I have had on it.
 

mayfly

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8,309
My main thought is you should consider a bridge that is compatible with a Bigsby.  Why?  Because Bisgby's are super fun.  Open the door and let the Bigsby into your life.  You'll thank me.

My secondary thought is that my '79 LP gold top with a Nashville sucked.  Of course, the Nashville was only part of the reason why it sucked.  But it was certainly a contributer.
 

stratamania

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9,481
I would personally go for a Nashville or Metric unless I was wanting to use something "vintage" for some reason.

I don't see a reason not to go metric, but then again I have metric tools - so being in the US maybe the Nashville may appeal more than metric.
 

ragamuffin

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Thanks guys, I went ahead and just ordered the Tonepros aluminum Nashville I had been looking at; we'll see how it works out.
 

BroccoliRob

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would love to know what mr. tburst has against metric TOMs (tune-o-matics, not people named 'Tom', but if he does have a problem with Toms i want to hear about that also, because jeez, there are tons of great Toms. like tom green, tom jones, and tom waits: "the Big 3", as i call 'em.

i'll even give thom york an honorary mention even though that's a dumb way to spell tom)
 

stratamania

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I heard Tom Hanks could be in the top 5 and tom thumb who probably is a warwick bass player :dontknow:
 

BroccoliRob

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stratamania said:
I heard Tom Hanks could be in the top 5 and tom thumb who probably is a warwick bass player :dontknow:

yah hank would be in my top 5 but "big 3" just has a better ring to it than "big 5". thats too many bigs to digest all at once. Like my dad used to say, k.i.s.s, keep it simple stupid. Great advice, hurt my feelings every time
 

stratamania

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BroccoliRob said:
stratamania said:
I heard Tom Hanks could be in the top 5 and tom thumb who probably is a warwick bass player :dontknow:

yah hank would be in my top 5 but "big 3" just has a better ring to it than "big 5". thats too many bigs to digest all at once. Like my dad used to say, k.i.s.s, keep it simple stupid. Great advice, hurt my feelings every time

Yikes, we forgot one of the most well known Toms, cutting edge in a novel way to begin with and later Rush made a song. You know Tom Sawyer perhaps too legendary to be rated.  :eek:ccasion14:
 

Rick

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Tom or Thomas means twin but it comes from the Greek  root meaning  cleave or cut , where we get atom, dichotomy and tome. Of course TOM is an acronym.
 

stratamania

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rick2 said:
Tom or Thomas means twin but it comes from the Greek  root meaning  cleave or cut , where we get atom, dichotomy and tome. Of course TOM is an acronym.

Unless you are being humorous where are you sourcing that?

As far as I can see it is from Hebrew or Aramaic and cleave Germanic. And the other words you mention have different derivations.
 

stratamania

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rick2 said:
I’m not kidding.  TOM is an acronym!

Well no, TOM is an abbreviation of Tune-O-Matic which is not an acronym, although I was asking about the other speculative word origins or derivations if you prefer of Tom or Thomas.
 

BroccoliRob

Senior member
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if still talkin' about tune-o-matic bridges, TOM would be an >initialism< since you say each letter separately, like FBI or TMI or ATM or DVD or BRB or LOL.

a acronym would be like LASER or SCUBA or RADAR where you mash the letters into a new word.  if you say TOM like the name Tom but are talking about a tune-o bridge, that's just weird, bro. it's Tee Oh Emm
 

Rick

Senior member
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4,539
I’ve been saying Tom like the name since forever ,  LOL
:bananaguitar:
 

stratamania

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I've never heard anyone say TOM as separate letters referring to a tune-o-matic bridge. Though if they did it would be an initialism. I actually would say tune-o-matic and use TOM as an abbreviation when writing it. Either way it is not an acronym.
 
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