Burnishing Raw Necks

stratamania

Senior member
Messages
9,208
Indeed finishing needs something to adhere to. If the surface is too smooth the shellac might wipe on and off without doing very much.

Per the sealer this is what it is and where to find it.

All our necks are dipped in an oil based penetrating sealer which is compatible with virtually all secondary finishes. This provides enhanced stability; however, it is not adequate protection for playing. We strongly recommend you apply a hard finish to all Maple, Mahogany, Walnut, Korina, and Koa necks.

Reference https://warmoth.com/guitar-neck-finishes
 

NonsenseTele

Senior member
Messages
8,256
Re-Pete said:
FernandoEsteves said:
So, they do what is described as "all our necks are dipped in an oil base penetrating sealer which is compatible with virtually all secondary finishes. This provides enhanced stability".

So, maybe is better think about a little bit of oil on them... Shelaq or whatever

I think that quote comes from the neck section of the Warmoth pages.... I think what they are saying - or go onto say -is that this sealant isn't enough to protect maple necks which may warp in transit due to temperature/humidity changes.

I've burnished a Wenge neck which was a tough job for my first one. Smooth as.  And that brings me to the second part....Finishing on a burnished neck?

Most shellac videos I've seen the sandpapering rarely goes beyond 400 grit paper. Burnishing goes way beyond that. A glass-like smooth surface on a guitar neck (like you get with burnishing), might not be a good surface to do shellacing on?

This is from the email Warmoth answered me
 

NonsenseTele

Senior member
Messages
8,256
Cagey said:
In my experience, once burnished they need no further finishing or attention. In fact, they're so slick you may have trouble getting anything to adhere to it. I've done countless necks this way, and have probably 20+ of my own done that way, and I've never had to do anything further to them. Of course, I'll also tell you SS frets don't wear out, but I know Mayfly has managed to chew through a set already :laughing7: But, worse thing that can happen is if it gets dirty, just take some finishing paper after it again. It's not like you take off enough material to change the dimensions.

How long you have these real raw necks?
Interesting because I don't really wanna have trouble
 

Cagey

Senior member
Messages
24,425
Mine are all between 3 to 12 yrs old. I believe they're all "modern construction", which is a remarkably stable design, and of varying species. Mostly roasted Maple but there's Pau Ferro, Bloodwood, Canary, Bubinga, Ziricote, Rosewood, Ebony, etc.
 

NonsenseTele

Senior member
Messages
8,256
Cagey said:
Mine are all between 3 to 12 yrs old. I believe they're all "modern construction", which is a remarkably stable design, and of varying species. Mostly roasted Maple but there's Pau Ferro, Bloodwood, Canary, Bubinga, Ziricote, Rosewood, Ebony, etc.
If you have one for 12 years completely raw, I may say it's safe  :toothy12:
 

Cagey

Senior member
Messages
24,425
Tonar's been doing it longer than I have (that's where I got the impetus to try it) and he even just uses regular raw Maple with no ill side effects. If any wood was going to misbehave, it would be that one. I'm quite confident you'll be happy with the results. The feel is just sublime.
 

Sadie-f

Senior member
Messages
427
I would hazard a thought that you don't have to use a burnished neck very long for skin oils to fill in the pores in the neck.

For my part, I prefer single layer of tung, feels the same after as it did burnished & bare.
 

electric__steve

Active member
Messages
45
Anyone have any thoughts on using buffer wheels on a benchtop buffer/grinder to burnish a neck?  If so, what type of wheels and compounds would one use?  I know rather little about this.

Also, do you all do the whole neck, i.e. headstock, or just the playing area?
 

Cagey

Senior member
Messages
24,425
Two issues come to mind. First, you'd be working against the grain, which is rarely a Good Thing. Second, rubbing/buffing compounds are too fine to start the process. You could perhaps use them to finish once you were up to needing 2000+ grits, but by that point you may as well just finish off with the polishing paper - you're almost done. Plus, dry abrasives keep any waste material out of any grain that may still be left.

 

Tonar8352

Senior member
Messages
2,195
I do a finial polish on a polishing arbor after I have the neck finished with 2000 grit Klingspor wet/dry and several coats of boiled linseed oil which are hand rubbed in.  I use a Stew/Mac Polishing arbor and Menzerna Ultra Fine Dry Polishing Compound. I still have to put in the work of burnishing the wood with the 2000 grit paper. It's easy; put a movie in and sand away while you watch.
 

Dograt

New member
Messages
1
Just done this to a roasted maple neck. Fascinating process and results…

Before was actually after starting with 400 grit for a few minutes.
 

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