Nuts, String Trees and Tuners- Help Needed

LooseCannon

Active member
Messages
44
Hey guys, i'm new here so I searched and read everything I could find on these but still have some questions:

1. I've read the warmoth installed nuts still need some work since the slots are too high and not wide enough for a 0.10 set, how much work do preslotted Graphtech nuts requier? Since I'll need a tech to do some work on the warmoth nut anyway, I could save some money if i'll get the Graphtech nut instead.

2. I'm also considering the Eearvana warmoth installed corian nut, i've read some people say it makes a huge difference and some say it barely makes a difference so I guess i'll get the same responses regarding the intonation improvment. What I would like to know is if it would requiere some work on it as well like the standard nut, and is working on it any different than on standard nuts? Also how strong is corian? Does it wear fast? Is it smooth enough or does it cause some binding?

3. Regarding string trees, which type do you recommend? The roller or the barrel? Or maybe the Graphtech ones?

4. Assuming i'm stringing the guitar the best and most correct way do I really need locking tuners? And do staggered tuners really eliminate the need for string trees? I've read that some of them aren't low enough and you still need them.

Thanks in advance
 

Unwound G

Senior member
Messages
835
LooseCannon said:
1. I've read the warmoth installed nuts still need some work since the slots are too high and not wide enough for a 0.10 set, how much work do preslotted Graphtech nuts requier? Since I'll need a tech to do some work on the warmoth nut anyway, I could save some money if i'll get the Graphtech nut instead.

Generally you won't need any more work done on the nut.  Always fully set up your guitar first before deciding if the nut needs to be widened or deepened.  For .010 - .046 guages, the pre-cut slots are fine.  You only need to widen them if you get into the realm of .012 - .056 or heavier guages.
 

Unwound G

Senior member
Messages
835
LooseCannon said:
2. I'm also considering the Eearvana warmoth installed corian nut, i've read some people say it makes a huge difference and some say it barely makes a difference so I guess i'll get the same responses regarding the intonation improvment. What I would like to know is if it would requiere some work on it as well like the standard nut, and is working on it any different than on standard nuts? Also how strong is corian? Does it wear fast? Is it smooth enough or does it cause some binding?

Earvana nuts work a bit like the famous Buzz Feiten tuning system which compensates each string to have perfect intonation all the way along the neck, so it claims.  Effectiveness again depends on your fretting hand touch, fret size, scalloped or non-scalloped fingerboard, string guage, bridge type and style of music you play.  For example, a Blues player who uses .010 - .046 guage set, medium jumbo frets, floating whammy bridge and a lot of bent notes will not require an Earvana nut.

Corian is pretty durable and smooth.  Unless you use a whammy for every other note, Corian will serve you for a long time.
 

Unwound G

Senior member
Messages
835
LooseCannon said:
4. Assuming i'm stringing the guitar the best and most correct way do I really need locking tuners? And do staggered tuners really eliminate the need for string trees? I've read that some of them aren't low enough and you still need them.

Locking tuners are for ease of string change.  Like you said, if you know how to wind strings correctly, it will stay in tune once the coil around the string posts settles.  Remember, most initial tuning instabilities are from the gears of the tuning machines and pre-stretching of new strings.

Stagger tuners like the ones made by Sperzel and Schaller do not require string trees on Warmoth necks.
 

mayfly

Senior member
Messages
8,168
Just adding my personal experience to the mix:

regarding the nut - you will need to fine tune the warmoth pre-cut nut for comfortable playing in the first position.  You'll need a set of nut files sized appropriate to your string gauge you are using.  I use graphtech pre-cut nuts and have been happy.

regarding string trees - I've been happy with the barrel trees.  Just one per guitar works for me.  Likely anything except for the vintage style will work just fine.

regarding locking tuners - I love my planet waves tuners.  But it's mostly for ease of string changes and "ready to go as soon as you change a string" ness.  You can wrap a string around a regular post so that it holds just as well, but that takes time and I'm a lazy bastard.
 
C

callaway

Guest
Yeah, I pretty much just echo the good advice already posted.

Regarding the nut: Size 10 strings will work. I liked mine the way mine came from Warmoth. I made a nut for one of my other guitars with super low string height at the nut---in fact, I'm surprised it doesn't buzz at all. While this is great for open-chord intonation, I can't use a slide on that guitar at all. The nut that came installed in my Warmoth neck is pretty good. I'd say the height is the same as a well-made factory instrument. So it could be lower if that's what you prefer, but they leave it in an "average" range so you have the option of keeping it there or lowering it yourself. If you have ever played an acoustic, then you should not find the Warmoth pre-cut height "uncomfortable".

I recommend leaving the nut alone and seeing how you like it. Then if you want it lower, give it a shot. If you screw up the nut, you can always buy a new nut blank for a few bucks and try again. (WARNING: if you get the Earvana nut installed, do not attempt to modify this nut until you know what you're doing. If you screw that nut up, it will be a pain to replace. It's thicker than the normal nut and of course you'd have to match the compensated string lengths.)

Regarding locking tuners: If you use a tremolo heavily, they will provide some added benefit over regular tuners. Even if you wrap the strings properly on regular tuners, you will have a repeated slackening and then tensioning, leading to the possibility that something may barely slip. The locking tuners won't slip. As mentioned already, even for non-tremolo users, locking tuners make string changes easier. They are generally noticeably heavier than normal tuners though.
 
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