installing tremolo, tuners, strap pegs and string retainers

Pestymonkey

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Hi guys,

How do I go about putting in the screws for the tuners, strap pegs, string retainers and the claw screws for the tremolo? Do I simply use a drill to make a pilot hole slightly smaller than the screw I'm going to put in and then screw the screws into the pilot hole? Should I use wax on the screws? Does the pilot hole need to run the whole depth that the screw will be in?

With string retainers, do warmoth pro necks already have the mouting holes for these or do I do this myself? If I do it myself, is there a set distance from the nut they should be, or is it just far enougth to add tension to the nut to ensure the strings don't slip out?

Also any tips on how to do the drilling (fast drill speed or slow, how to ensure the drill doesn't slip or splinter the wood)?

Thanks
 
Pestymonkey said:
Hi guys,

How do I go about putting in the screws for the tuners, strap pegs, string retainers and the claw screws for the tremolo? Do I simply use a drill to make a pilot hole slightly smaller than the screw I'm going to put in and then screw the screws into the pilot hole? Should I use wax on the screws? Does the pilot hole need to run the whole depth that the screw will be in?

With string retainers, do warmoth pro necks already have the mouting holes for these or do I do this myself? If I do it myself, is there a set distance from the nut they should be, or is it just far enougth to add tension to the nut to ensure the strings don't slip out?

Also any tips on how to do the drilling (fast drill speed or slow, how to ensure the drill doesn't slip or splinter the wood)?

Medium speed, use a sharp bit.  If you have a drill press use it, if not, take pains to keep things square.

Make the holes a little smaller than the screws.  String retainers and tuners use a 5/64 bit.  Forget which one for strap lugs.

Put the tuners on, line em all up.  If you have kluson type, you can line them up and spot the end hole, then just keep things straight from there.  If you have others... like Schaller... keep them perfectly lined up by screwing down the tuners with their bushings, then spotting the holes.

Mark the drill with tape for depth, dont go all the way thru!  Drill down close to the depth of the screw, but if its a little short, it will still do.  A little, not a lot short.  A lot short and you break the screw, then you got problems.  Rub the screw on a candle, and put it in the hole.  If it gets tight, back off half a turn then go forward again.  You may need to re-wax on maple and other really hard woods.

You'll have to spot the holes for the retainers and tuners and strap lugs.  The retainers - when its all strung up, use the strings themselves to make sure its "in the right place".  Just slack the strings a bit and use them for proper orientation.  Screw 'er real good (the retainer that is) and then retune.

 
The screws that hold strap lugs vary greatly; check the screws against your bits and use one a size or two smaller to drill the pilot holes.
 
cheers guys, thats some great information.

What about the claw screws that connect to the springs for the tremolo? Are the pilots for these pre-drilled or do I have to find someway of doing them myself? Any useful tips?
 
You get to put the holes where ever you like 'em.

Typically, those are drilled at a shallow angle, they're not parallel with the length of the body. 
 
I've never installed a trem, but would I be wrong in assuming a right angle drill might be helpful if one were to already posess such an item?
 
Unless your regular drill has a HUGE body, the right angle is no advantage in tremolo claw screw hole creation.

The advantage of right angle drills is where the "backspace" is limited - as in drilling between beams or between a pipe and a cabinet, etc.  In a Strat body, the problem is more of depth of the pocket.  Personally, in cases like that, I use a 2.4v Milwaukee screwdriver and drill chuck on it.
Its a shallow affair that works quite well for this sort of thing.

6545-6.jpg


Dont let the 2.4v battery scare ya on this.  I've got two of these, one older (like from 1985) and one newer from a few years ago... and they have balls.  Think in terms of putting in door hinge screws, into pine, with no pilot hole... just whack em in there.  Now think in terms of one battery doing this all day.  Balls.  Its in the planetary gearing.  The body of this is very tough, and not very fat, so it deals well with Strat pockets (once you put the chuck on, and the chuck is in "the kit" when you buy it.)
 
I stand corrected!!!

This is good.  It didn't used to be that way.  Thanks Jack
 
Awesome, I was hoping they'd be predrilled, they're the only ones I was a bit sketchy about doing myself. The others should be do-able.

Thanks for all the information guys
 
I had a thought. what if you dipped the screws in melted wax and let them cool and dry before installing? Would this weaken the structure of the screws? Would it be ok but a total waste of time?

Brian
 
You can do that, but its not really needed.... no harm done, to answer your question. 

I'm reminded of glue covered nails... to be shot into wood.  Doesn't hurt a thing, unless you shoot yourself.  There are also prelubed machine screws, and "nylock" machine screws as well.  Coating screws is not new.
 
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