I blame Dave Grohl

Chris of Arabia

Senior member
Messages
376
For the first time ever, I have not one but two guitars (inc. the W Strat) set up in dropped D and they've been like that for more than 24 hours - what is the world coming to?  :icon_scratch:
 

Chris of Arabia

Senior member
Messages
376
Ermm... kind of caught up with work and studying an MBA sort of. I've started, but have only got the bridge and tailpiece studs in so far.

Have to say that I'm very impressed with the parts I received, that neck is going to be very nice indeed I think.
 

Shmoopie

Senior member
Messages
1,582
RAGE
        AGAINST
                        THE
                              MACHINE
                                              !
 

nathan a

Senior member
Messages
1,836
Nahh drop D is way more useful than people give it credit for. You can do so much more than just one-finger power chords. It opens up a world of fingerstyle playing, great for folk, classical, middle eastern styles, celtic stuff, all that. Blues, you name it. Let's get rid of the Drop-D = Nu-Metal stereotype.
 

tfarny

Senior member
Messages
4,481
Drop D is nice, but is it that big a deal?. I've been mucking around with DADGAD and open D, and that's been lot of fun too.
 

Volitions Advocate

Senior member
Messages
1,239
When I was learning my first couple years of guitar I played on a lot of exotic tunings.
DADF#AD, CGCGCD & DADADE,

But I"ve found that they're not very useful on electric, only acoustic.  but thats just my thinking.

If you want something interesting instead of drop D give this one a try : EBEGBE, pretty useful on an electric i've found
 

Chris_Lohmann

Active member
Messages
39
nathan a said:
Nahh drop D is way more useful than people give it credit for. You can do so much more than just one-finger power chords. It opens up a world of fingerstyle playing, great for folk, classical, middle eastern styles, celtic stuff, all that. Blues, you name it. Let's get rid of the Drop-D = Nu-Metal stereotype.

I agree. Andres Segovia (widely regarded to be one of the greatest, if not the greatest, classical guitarist ever) used drop D to great effect in 1927 (beating Nirvana and the Foo Fighters and Nu-Metal to the punch by, oh, about 70 years) when he performed for the first time his arrangement of Bach's Chaconne in D Minor (a piece that Bach had written for the violin some 220 years earlier). This was at a time when the guitar was considered to be no more sophisticated than the Banjo. It was considered to be a hillbilly instrument and not an instrument that Gentlemen played. Gentlemen played the piano or the violin and the like. Segovia changed all of that almost overnight. After Segovia first performed the piece in Paris, France, I believe, a French music critic said that it was as if that piece had been written for the guitar or that the guitar had been made to play that piece. I have a recording of Segovia himself playing the piece in New York City in 1954 and it is truly magnificent.

On a related note, I've been playing for almost 12 years and I spent 2 1/2 of those 12 years taking five semesters of Music Theory at my local community college. While there, I took one semester of private guitar lessons with a classical guitarist who, at that time, had been playing for 27-28 years and was working on earning his Doctorate in guitar from the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. One day, I took my copy of the sheet music of Segovia's arrangement of Bach's Chaconne in D Minor with me to my lesson just to see if my instructor could play it. He attempted to play the first 3 or 4 bars, stopped playing, looked at me and said, "This is hard, man."
 
G

guitlouie

Guest
I have to agree that drop d is a nu-metal or modern rock staple and can seem like that is all it is good for, but the first time I stumbled across it was when I learned a Neil Young song at a young age.  Guess which one.
 

onedrop

Senior member
Messages
118
guitlouie said:
I have to agree that drop d is a nu-metal or modern rock staple and can seem like that is all it is good for, but the first time I stumbled across it was when I learned a Neil Young song at a young age.  Guess which one.

Harvest Moon
 

onedrop

Senior member
Messages
118
Volitions Advocate said:
If you want something interesting instead of drop D give this one a try : EBEGBE, pretty useful on an electric i've found

Albert Collins  :glasses10:
 

Crappy

Senior member
Messages
210
Try DADAAD on a 12 String.

[youtube=425,350]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LF_S3n4ff1E[/youtube]
 

Xplorervoodoo

Senior member
Messages
984
How bout open C for Electric?

Bit of wankery at the beginning, but then he settles into a great solo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jy7PDnbY6d8
 
R

RLW

Guest
I have a Martin 00028-EC that has been tuned to Open G for ten years. If you had a chance to play it, you would understand why. In standard tuning, it was just a real good guitar. One day I decided to tune it to Open G so I could learn Hot Tuna's "Water Song", and the guitar simply came alive. The sound went from two-dimensinal to three-dimensional in a matter of seconds. Tones, overtones, and harmonics that the guitar had never produced before. Quite an amazing thing to experience.
 
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