Paying Warmoth to install the Wilkinson Trem Studs

Blackmore

New member
Messages
15
Quick question - I see that Warmoth will install the wilikinson tremolo studs for $10.  Are the studs particularly difficult to install (for a guy with average skills) or is the installation of the studs so critical for proper functionality of the trem that it's just better for Warmoth to do it?

Seems pretty straight forward to me but thought I'd check with the experts.

Thanks in advance.
 

mayfly

Senior member
Messages
8,170
To do it yourself and do it right, you'll need a hydraulic press.  Using a hammer or enlarging the holes is not on.

IMHO, it's just better to get W to do it.
 
W

Watershed

Guest
I really can't comment on the Wilkinson studs, but I banged in Floyd studs with a wood block and hammer and it worked fine.
Although, I suppose things could have gone wrong, and you could chalk up the 10 bones to "insurance".
I'll admit, It did make me a bit nervous, but it worked out fine.
 

Patrick from Davis

Senior member
Messages
2,197
For 10 bucks, you can't go wrong.  The drawback is that you buy the hardware from them, so if it is something that they don't sell, drat.  But they have good prices on the items they do sell.  It sounds like you will be using a bridge that they sell.  $10 just does not seem like much for something that has the potential to go so wrong.
Patrick

 

lafromla1

Senior member
Messages
837
I paid the $10 and had piece of mind.....I'm gonna pay it again on my next build as well.
 

stubhead

Senior member
Messages
4,669
sledgehammer.jpg


Today, I feel good about myself.... :blob7:
 

DocNrock

Senior member
Messages
4,295
I used to have Warmoth do it.  Then one day I got brave and used a hammer and block of wood.  Worked fine.  I've done five this way now.  No issues.
 

Justinginn

Senior member
Messages
631
It's ridiculously easy. As long as you make sure you've got some padding, don't attack the pegs with the hammer, and aren't roaring drunk, you should be fine.
 

Steve_Karl

Senior member
Messages
1,618
I just received my order today and didn't remember to have Warmoth install the studs.
It's a Winkinson VS-100 trem.

1 Question:
How far down in should the studs go? My guess is the top of the stud should be flush with the body ... but ...
looking at the studs on my LP stop tail piece they're recessed a bit.

Advice is appreciated!

Thanks,

Steve

 

jackthehack

Senior member
Messages
5,630
Steve_Karl said:
I just received my order today and didn't remember to have Warmoth install the studs.
It's a Winkinson VS-100 trem.

1 Question:
How far down in should the studs go? My guess is the top of the stud should be flush with the body ... but ...
looking at the studs on my LP stop tail piece they're recessed a bit.

Advice is appreciated!

Thanks,

Steve

Just flush is fine/preferable; 1 lb. hammer and a washrag
 

nexrex

Senior member
Messages
954
Just a trick i picked up from a guitar tech friend. Get you studs and pop them in the freezer. The metal will shrink, and then put a dab of past wax on the bottom. Doing this now, and they practically slide in. Hammer and wood block to tap them in with little effort.
:headbang: :headbang:
 

BigBeard

Senior member
Messages
433
nexrex said:
Just a trick i picked up from a guitar tech friend. Get you studs and pop them in the freezer. The metal will shrink, and then put a dab of past wax on the bottom. Doing this now, and they practically slide in. Hammer and wood block to tap them in with little effort.
:headbang: :headbang:

I never thought of freezing bridge studs or bushings....  I do freeze the bronze pilot bushing when I change a clutch in my pickup truck, makes them slide right in with a tiny bit of persuasion from the deadblow hammer  And waxing or soaping a bushing is definately the way to go.  In fact, you should have a bar of soap or an old candle around you anytime you are working with hardwood and screws (which, as guitar builders, we run into this situation during every assembly we do, unless we are building pine guitars!!)

I recommend doing them yourself.  If it is a stud, use a block of wood and be gentle.  Use a deadblow hammer if you can get one.  That is what they are made for.

If you are installing bushings, you can take the bushing to the hardware store and get a 2" or 3" bolt that threads into the stud with a couple of nuts and thread the bushing onto the bolt and whack away.  That way too you have a stud puller if the time ever comes that you need to pull the bushing back out of the guitar.

This one is an easy one, and it's an easy $10 for warmoth.  I wouldn't ever be uncomfortable with installing my own studs or bushings, and I am cheap, I can buy a lot of bolts for $10.  Oh well you got her done, which is the most important part of the thread.

There is nothing to be afraid of when working on your Warmoth......  If you mess something up, it can be fixed.  Anything can be fixed.  We aren't working on '57 Les Pauls or '54 strats here, we are working with project materials.  chip or scratch your nice shiny new finish, they make stuff that you can 'flow' new laquer into old etc.  Blow out a hole for a stud, nothing that a dowel rod and a drill can't fix.  Also, look outside the box when it comes to having stuff done that you cannot do.  Some (not all) machine shops that do engine work don't mind setting up their drill press to drll some holes for you.  You'd be amazed how much more a simple case of beer or a joint can buy you than the actual money you spent on the beer or doob!!  Just remember if you do ever decide to have a machine shop do any work to your guitar, especially if it is unfinished guitar to tape everything on the body unless you want greasy fingerprints all over your new quilted maple top!!! 
 

Dan025

Senior member
Messages
1,681
nexrex said:
Just a trick i picked up from a guitar tech friend. Get you studs and pop them in the freezer. The metal will shrink, and then put a dab of past wax on the bottom. Doing this now, and they practically slide in. Hammer and wood block to tap them in with little effort.
:headbang: :headbang:

you must have one cold freezer!

this trick helps with metal being pressed into metal where the interference is maybe .001-.002" depending on the diameter of the part. beyond that you need something like dry ice or liquid nitrogen to negate the need of a press or a bigger hammer. the diameter of the studs is way to small to make a difference but it may help keep the wax from thinning or something.

i used to install bearings in magnisium landing gear wheels on f-15's the interference fit was as much as .006" we needed 2 guys a 100ton press liquid nitrigen and a heat treat oven to get it done. at i think it was about 6" in diameter it look -300degF + on the bearing and 200-300degF on the wheel to make that .006" difference and the bearing warmed up before you hit the bottom of the hole 3 in 4 times which is what the press was for.

since it is wood an arbor press or a hammer as long as you keep it strait will do just fine. the interference is likely greater than .005" as i doubt that the holes are reamed more accurately than that. not that the reamer doesn't make a good hole but because with all the species of wood and varying hardness and expansion due to humidity i think it is hard to keep it consistant and more interference is better than none.
 

nexrex

Senior member
Messages
954
Dan025 said:
nexrex said:
Just a trick i picked up from a guitar tech friend. Get you studs and pop them in the freezer. The metal will shrink, and then put a dab of past wax on the bottom. Doing this now, and they practically slide in. Hammer and wood block to tap them in with little effort.
:headbang: :headbang:

you must have one cold freezer!

this trick helps with metal being pressed into metal where the interference is maybe .001-.002" depending on the diameter of the part. beyond that you need something like dry ice or liquid nitrogen to negate the need of a press or a bigger hammer. the diameter of the studs is way to small to make a difference but it may help keep the wax from thinning or something.

i used to install bearings in magnisium landing gear wheels on f-15's the interference fit was as much as .006" we needed 2 guys a 100ton press liquid nitrigen and a heat treat oven to get it done. at i think it was about 6" in diameter it look -300degF + on the bearing and 200-300degF on the wheel to make that .006" difference and the bearing warmed up before you hit the bottom of the hole 3 in 4 times which is what the press was for.

since it is wood an arbor press or a hammer as long as you keep it strait will do just fine. the interference is likely greater than .005" as i doubt that the holes are reamed more accurately than that. not that the reamer doesn't make a good hole but because with all the species of wood and varying hardness and expansion due to humidity i think it is hard to keep it consistant and more interference is better than none.

Not sure about the science of it all. All, i know is that they did shrink enough for me to tap them in easily. The wax helped, but before the freezer them were "tighter than a drum", afterwards I could practically push them in by hand. PS, Warmoth do sell the Wilkinson stud as parts of their own, they can be found here http://www.warmoth.com/Tremolo-Parts-C856.aspx
 
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