How to lower one new Warmoth fret? "Sprung", or no?

stubhead

Senior member
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4,669
The 23rd fret on my seven-string neck is high enough to affect the notes down to the 20th fret on the top three strings. I know Warmoth superglues their frets. It doesn't seem to move when I press on it with a little wood block, so it seems unlikely that beating on it will lower it?

"And stay down, boy...."

I've fixed high frets on "normal" necks before - I have C-clamps, thick and thin superglue, slow superglue, superglue accelerator and remover... however, is it worth it to even try pulling the neck off, running a touch of glue in there and clamping? It's a dinky little space.... :sad: Or, should I just level it and re-crown? Can a Warmoth fret "spring"? :help:
 

-CB-

Senior member
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5,427
If you level and recrown, it wont be right.  The notes will sound dead.

Mask the area you dont want superglue on.  Wax over it with a birthday candle.  Leave about 1/32 inch "clean" on each side of the fret.  Prepare a clamp and caul (if you think you need a caul).  Run the glue into each side of the fret, put wax paper over it, and clamp it (with or without caul).  Let it sit a day.  Unclamp it.  Clean up the excess.  You're done.

Now... if you didn't quite get it down all the way, at least its gonna be tight, and ring good notes.  If you need to finesse it a bit after that, you'll be working with something solid, not something loose.
 

stubhead

Senior member
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4,669
Well, it was absolutely glued tight when I got it, just too high. I'm not sure how that could happen, given the way Warmoth builds necks, but I suspect it might have something to do with it being the 23rd fret on a seven-string neck with a 25" scale. That doesn't even sound like their normal Clampomatic Fret-o-tron would work on it, huh? I just carefully, carefully leveled, crowned 'n' polished  the single fret, using a not-official not-Stew/Mac fret rocker straightedge-type thingie or two. All is well, this guitar may soon be a monster....

S6300084.jpg


:party07: Grrr.... :evil4:  :party07:
 

-CB-

Senior member
Messages
5,427
Just get the caul, or mini sanding block that matches your radius. 

BUT - what you want to try first - I didn't read your first post well enough.. my bad... you can usually seat a fret by gently tapping it down.  If its glued (it is) it will grab and stay down.  Take off the neck.  Hold the neck heel on something stout like a solid bench, and use a plastic mallet <-- PLASTIC, clean smooth and PLASTIC.  Or use a small scrap of non marring stuff.  That is, I use a strip of aluminum about 1/8 thick and press it on the fret then tap LIGHTLY on the aluminum.  Make sure the aluminum is not full of crud, or have grooves, creases, etc.. smooth is where ya want to be.  Press the aluminum tightly onto the fret too, so you minimize the possibility of crown damage.

I've done dozens of frets this way... and most folks just don't realize that frets do spring out and reseating them is a permanent fix.

 
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