Do you play acoustic guitar, and feel adventurous?...

mrpinter

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and are thinking about switching to a different brand of strings. I have something kind of different for you to try.

Dogal is a string manufacturer based in Venice, Italy, founded in 1950, that makes hand crafted strings for guitar and other stringed instruments. They are unique in their use of non traditional materials and construction in many of their sets.

I’ve been using a set of electric jazz strings called Expressives on one of my guitars, and love them - they’re easy to play and have a rich, warm sound. There is no nickel in them, the windings are made of a special alloy of carbon steel; and they have a round core. Another electric set I use (called Chromesteel) is made of chrome, and they’re equally great: bright and aggressive - perfect for rock and fusion. They are more conventional roundwounds, with a hex core.

So when I came across their Nightclub series of flatwound acoustic strings, I couldn’t resist. There are several sets in the series, most are conventional phosphor bronze, but unconventional for acoustic strings being flatwounds. They are written up in the distributor’s notes as having been developed for acoustic archtop jazz guitars - but goes on to say they are also good for other kinds of acoustics, including flat tops. One 5 star reviewer said he plays them on a Gibson Hummingbird. They have jazz style gauging - lighter on the bass side, for more balanced feel and volume, and are on round cores. Like most flatwounds, they have absoluteley no finger squeak. There are 3 weights - one roughly equivalent to an extra light set of 10s, one you would choose to replace 12s, and one super light set set of .010-.042.

There is one other set in the series that is not phosphor bronze but chrome, and that is the set that got my attention. It only comes in one gauge: .011-.044. My aging hands do best with lighter strings, so they looked perfect for me. To be brief, I love them. They are much brighter than you’d expect from flatwounds; are easy to play; have a lot of volume for a light set of strings; have great articulation and a glassy smooth feel. I haven’t tried any of the phosphor bronze sets (yet), but no doubt they’re warmer and “mellower” sounding - if you don’t like bright acoustic strings - and still with all the nice characteristics of flatwounds.

But be warned - if you’re on a tight budget you may want to skip these, because you’ll probably like them and they cost over $30 per set. They are said to be very long lasting, however.

Here are what the packaging, and the strings on a guitar, look like (notice that, being chrome, they are a shiny silver color):

nightclub strings package in hand.jpg

nightclub strings on headstock 2 smaller for unoff warnoth.jpg
 
I never thought about it much until you mentioned it, but I'm pretty sure in 35 years worth of playing I have never used anything but the same old sets of D'Addario acoustic strings. $300 Yamaha or my J-45, same thing.
 
^^^ yeah but they'll last a long time - like flatwounds in general. I know it sort of defies the laws of physics, but that set of lightweight 11-44 Nightclub strings drives the top of my acoustic like a much heavier 12 or 13 set - at least it sounds that way to me. And feels that way too - the strings really resonate my lightly built guitar.
 
^^^ yeah but they'll last a long time - like flatwounds in general. I know it sort of defies the laws of physics, but that set of lightweight 11-44 Nightclub strings drives the top of my acoustic like a much heavier 12 or 13 set - at least it sounds that way to me. And feels that way too - the strings really resonate my lightly built guitar.
What kind of acoustic are you playing, Mike?

*EDIT - I see from the photo it's a John David Scott. Buncha ex-Larrivee guys are likely to know what they're about.
 
What kind of acoustic are you playing, Mike?

*EDIT - I see from the photo it's a John David Scott. Buncha ex-Larrivee guys are likely to know what they're about.
I'm surprised you know about them. Yeah, David Amirault worked for Larrivee and learned his trade there I believe. He's gone now, from cancer, sadly. He built one heck of a guitar; this one is a permanent keeper. I've got the action low like an electric, the neck is a nice medium-slim C shape that is very much like the shape on my Pinter guitars (kind of Fender-ish). It has a sweet tone and it's a cannon volume-wise.
 
But be warned - if you’re on a tight budget you may want to skip these, because you’ll probably like them and they cost over $30 per set. They are said to be very long lasting, however.

i'm not even on a tight budget and a $30USD string set is opulescent (fancy word for fancy or luxury). they may last long but will they last as long as three (3) $9USD dadarrio sets? 🤔 i ain't about to become a hit & run victim on the information super highway
 
The latest acoustic string to surprise me are GHS Americana PBs. Wow. Not your dads thudding boomy PBs.
 
i'm not even on a tight budget and a $30USD string set is opulescent (fancy word for fancy or luxury). they may last long but will they last as long as three (3) $9USD dadarrio sets? 🤔 i ain't about to become a hit & run victim on the information super highway
Good flatwound strings typically outlast regular roundwounds by a big margin. A lot of performers using jazz flats on their archtops can go for a year or more before feeling the need to change strings. As far as "good" flatwounds go, Dogals are among the very best; and I would be surprised if my set of R39 Nightclub acoustic strings won't last longer than three sets of D'Addarios. I'd play them even if they didn't have that longevity, because they sound better (to my ears at least); and the feel of these strings is unparalleled - smooth as glass, with absolutely no finger squeak. Even non-musicians (like my wife) find that finger noise on acoustics annoying. So there's at least three reasons to use my choice of strings. If you can afford them to begin with, they'll pay you back.
 
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