Truss rod.

Wana_make_a_guitar

Senior member
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2,793
I can see that my neck needs a truss rod adjustment. The action n the 24th is more than 2 times as high as the action on the 1st (It looks that way, i'm probably dramatizing it though.). It seems I need to tighten up the truss rod to straighten it, this means I have to much relief?. Is this correct? If so, with the headstock front facing me i turn the truss rod from left to right to tighten.

I'm not gonna rush into it anytime soon. I saw it needed to be done and was putting it off until I broke a string about an hour ago with pulling up on the Floyd.
 

DocNrock

Senior member
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4,295
There are two considerations.  One is that you may need to tighten your truss rod.  The other is that you may simply need to lower the Floyd.  Obviously, I can't see your neck, but perhaps try lowering the Floyd a bit first.  If that causes buzzing, then restore the Floyd to its original height and tighten the truss rod.

With the headstock facing you, right to left to tighten.
 
C

callaway

Guest
I recommend getting either of Dan Erlewine's books---How to Make Your Electric Guitar Play Great or Guitar Player Repair Guide. The first one is probably better if you're just getting your feet wet in these sort of setup issues, and the second is maybe way too in-depth and covers tons of repairs I would never try! Anyway, that book will tell you how to measure the relief and adjust it appropriately. The book is well worth it's money, and they usually have them in most Barnes & Noble stores I've been in.

Oh, one thing to remember when you adjust the truss rod is to never turn more than 1/4 turn at a time! Make your adjustment and then give it time (a few hours or even overnight) to fully settle before adjusting more if necessary.
 

tfarny

Senior member
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4,481
Here's how to tell if it's your bridge or your neck relief:
Have somebody hold down the low E string at the first fret and at the highest fret at the same time. The gap between the top of the 8th fret and the bottom of that string should be the same as or less than the diameter of a high E string (about .010 or .090). Take a spare high E and see if it clears that gap - you'll need good light but you're young so I'm sure your eyes are good. If the gap is much bigger than the E, your truss rod is too loose and needs to be turned clockwise using the allen wrench that came with your neck. Turn it about 1/4 turn, wait fifteen minutes, then check again and repeat if necc. As long as you follow these instructions and don't force the adjuster too hard, you won't screw anything up. If your eyes are really good and you're patient, try to get the neck relief just about 1/2 the diameter of that high E string.

THEN, adjust the action on your bridge so it is just above the point that it buzzes too much for your liking. I take it a bit too low, then make tiny adjustments over a week or so of playing till it gets just perfect.

Oh, and if you bought a warmoth pre-cut nut, you'll probably get a much better playing guitar if you lower the nut slots a bit, but that's for another time.
 

Wana_make_a_guitar

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2,793
Right. Thanks guys. One more question, i should only adjust the truss rod when the strings are De-tuned to the point where the slacken off the fretboard, right?
 

mayfly

Senior member
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8,224
Wana's_makin'_a_guitar said:
Right. Thanks guys. One more question, i should only adjust the truss rod when the strings are De-tuned to the point where the slacken off the fretboard, right?

In theory you should only turn the nut when the strings are slack.

In practice, I cheat:  I press down on the headstock until the strings contact the frets to relieve tension on the neck, then I turn the nut.  But that's just me - YMMV.
 

dbw

Senior member
Messages
4,531
If I'm only turning it 1/4 turn or something I just go for it.  I loosen the D and G strings so I can get a wrench in there, but that's it.
 

Wana_make_a_guitar

Senior member
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2,793
Well, done. I hardly even turned it 1/4 of a turn because I realized it was mostly of the compound radius that it looked like it did.
 

blue313

Senior member
Messages
2,824
tfarny said:
Here's how to tell if it's your bridge or your neck relief:
Have somebody hold down the low E string at the first fret and at the highest fret at the same time. The gap between the top of the 8th fret and the bottom of that string should be the same as or less than the diameter of a high E string (about .010 or .090). Take a spare high E and see if it clears that gap - you'll need good light but you're young so I'm sure your eyes are good. If the gap is much bigger than the E, your truss rod is too loose and needs to be turned clockwise using the allen wrench that came with your neck. Turn it about 1/4 turn, wait fifteen minutes, then check again and repeat if necc. As long as you follow these instructions and don't force the adjuster too hard, you won't screw anything up. If your eyes are really good and you're patient, try to get the neck relief just about 1/2 the diameter of that high E string.

THEN, adjust the action on your bridge so it is just above the point that it buzzes too much for your liking. I take it a bit too low, then make tiny adjustments over a week or so of playing till it gets just perfect.

Oh, and if you bought a warmoth pre-cut nut, you'll probably get a much better playing guitar if you lower the nut slots a bit, but that's for another time.
A capo at the first fret works great for this, it totally frees up one hand and returns it to a one man operation.

So the actions ok then?
 

Wana_make_a_guitar

Senior member
Messages
2,793
Blue313 said:
A capo at the first fret works great for this, it totally frees up one hand and returns it to a one man operation.

So the actions ok then?
Yeah. It's all good now. All finished and strung up. I also removed a spring it's got three now. so it's easier to use the trem. Thats un-related though.

Still looks weird though, but it plays way better.
 
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