Shielding. Which is better paint or tape?

blue313

Senior member
Messages
2,824
I like copper foil tape with conductive adhesive.  It's much easier to remove than paint and its really not that hard to work with.  The only downside I've run into is that its pricier than paint.  They both work well when properly applied though.
 

Volitions Advocate

Senior member
Messages
1,239
I'd agree.

Especially in the case of a top route.  I paint the cavity, tape the Pickguard.

actually I guess that works with a rear route too... because you have to cover the control routes in any case.
 

line6man

Senior member
Messages
6,443
Foil:

Pros:
Cheaper
Can easily be soldered to

Cons:
Messy looking
Can be difficult to apply in tight spaces

Paint:

Pros:
Clean look
Easier to apply

Cons:
Expensive
Cannot be soldered to
Does not work for pickguards
 

TroubledTreble

Senior member
Messages
830
Coming from a background (work wise) that makes me want to shield everything I have a new opinion on this subject. As I promised Jack, in the interest of science, I did my latest build without shielding the cavity, only the pickguard was shielded since it came that way.

In one guitar I copper taped every last millimeter and left not one area for interference to get in. In another guitar I did nothing. All the electronics were the same and the pickups were the same. The result was that there was no discernable difference. Maybe I don't play in areas that it would really make a difference but I can honestly say that I could not find any difference.

I can understand the desire to do it, and support it, but you can always do it later if it needs it.

There ya go Jack. I keep my word, and you, were right.

http://www.unofficialwarmoth.com/index.php?topic=1481.0
 

DocNrock

Senior member
Messages
4,295
TroubledTreble said:
Coming from a background (work wise) that makes me want to shield everything I have a new opinion on this subject. As I promised Jack, in the interest of science, I did my latest build without shielding the cavity, only the pickguard was shielded since it came that way.

In one guitar I copper taped every last millimeter and left not one area for interference to get in. In another guitar I did nothing. All the electronics were the same and the pickups were the same. The result was that there was no discernable difference. Maybe I don't play in areas that it would really make a difference but I can honestly say that I could not find any difference.

I can understand the desire to do it, and support it, but you can always do it later if it needs it.

There ya go Jack. I keep my word, and you, were right.

http://www.unofficialwarmoth.com/index.php?topic=1481.0

I too listened to Jack on this one.  I haven't shielded another guitar since.  They're all quiet, even playing near the computer.  I will admit, however, that I use humbuckers almost exclusively.  If I did a build with true single coils, I'd probably still shield, and would use paint.
 

line6man

Senior member
Messages
6,443
Shielding may not be a big deal with humbuckers, but single coils are a whole 'nother animal as far as noise is concerned...

No amount of shielding will make your instrument dead silent, but a good shielding job does contribute to a quieter instrument.
Just how much is debatable, but IMO, a good instrument should be shielded anyways.

 

jackthehack

Senior member
Messages
5,630
line6man said:
Shielding may not be a big deal with humbuckers, but single coils are a whole 'nother animal as far as noise is concerned...

No amount of shielding will make your instrument dead silent, but a good shielding job does contribute to a quieter instrument.
Just how much is debatable, but IMO, a good instrument should be shielded anyways.

My experiments were done in a commercial screen room used to do FCC RF testing on cell phones and involved both Fender type single coils and P90s; if using shielding tape or paint makes you feel better, knock yourself out. Bottom line is, it has a near nil effect.
 

Patrick from Davis

Senior member
Messages
2,197
The other note is that some preamps in basses can be noisy if not shielded.  They amp up the noise on board so you have to shield them.  Not so much the pickups, but the cavity where the preamp resides.
Patrick

 
Top