Neck Wont Screw All The Way Down...

Killswitch95

Active member
Messages
40
Hello,

I finally got the neck for the guitar I've been building and got everything ready to assemble but the neck won't screw all the way down...

td1mNwF.jpg


It's a Warmoth strat replacement neck on a squier classic vibe body and the screws are leaving about 2mm thick gap on all four...
Now before I just 'power through it' is this normal? Or is this something I should have a pro deal with because the last thing I want to do is split the neck...
 

cromulent

Senior member
Messages
219
You can hold one of the screws to the side of the assembly to see how far it would penetrate into the neck (ie, if it would hit the fretboard). 
 

Killswitch95

Active member
Messages
40
cromulent said:
You can hold one of the screws to the side of the assembly to see how far it would penetrate into the neck (ie, if it would hit the fretboard).

Yeah I did that before and it wont, I'm just concerned about the amount of resistance... If it's not drilled all the way then wont it crack?
 

Killswitch95

Active member
Messages
40
I also have a spare black back plate... Do you think using it as filler would be a bad idea? Like stacking them?
 

cromulent

Senior member
Messages
219
In my experience, new necks tend to have a fair bit of resistance.  I believe both Warmoth and Fender advocate the use of screw wax, or even just bar soap as lubrication. 

https://www.stewmac.com/video-and-ideas/online-resources/learn-about-building-instruments-and-kits/how-to-install-a-fender-style-bolt-on-neck/

If you're really concerned, you could give Warmoth a call.
 

Spud

Senior member
Messages
960
First off don't force it! I am willing to wager the Squier body thickness where the neck attaches is a couple mills less than an American STd or Warmoth. Get a caliper and measure it. Are you using wax or at least soap to help ease the screws in? You may have to slightly deepen the neck holes.

I would call WARMOTH to inquire.
 

Killswitch95

Active member
Messages
40
Spud said:
First off don't force it! I am willing to wager the Squier body thickness where the neck attaches is a couple mills less than an American STd or Warmoth. Get a caliper and measure it. Are you using wax or at least soap to help ease the screws in? You may have to slightly deepen the neck holes.

I would call WARMOTH to inquire.

I did not think to use any sort of lube such as wax or soap so let me give that a shot...
 

Spud

Senior member
Messages
960
Killswitch95 said:
Spud said:
First off don't force it! I am willing to wager the Squier body thickness where the neck attaches is a couple mills less than an American STd or Warmoth. Get a caliper and measure it. Are you using wax or at least soap to help ease the screws in? You may have to slightly deepen the neck holes.

I would call WARMOTH to inquire.

I did not think to use any sort of lube such as wax or soap so let me give that a shot...

Rub the screws on bar soap so the threads have soap in them. I prefer Dial Gold, It keeps my guitars fresh!  :laughing7:
 

Spud

Senior member
Messages
960
I am glad all is well. I do hope you used Dial or at least Coast for long lasting freshness.
 

Rick

Senior member
Messages
4,328
Yep ... you gotta use a little wax.  I use a little dab of bees wax on the tip and first couple threads.  I've used floor wax without complications but I think it's like soap and has other ingredients in it.  That said, it does work to get the screw in.
 

Spud

Senior member
Messages
960
Apparently using the wax from a wax toilet setting ring is supposed to be the best actually. Never tried it myself.
 

DuckBaloo

Senior member
Messages
282
Killswitch95 said:
Got her in! Thanks, didn't think to lube it up first haha...

Wax up every screw that goes into a new body or neck to avoid cracking the wood ... especially tuner screws (head-stocks are relatively thin and the screws go into the grain at its most vulnerable).

I buy one of those little lap-balm size tins of beeswax at hardware stores...they are overpriced for what they are but, over the years, the $5 is insignificant.

I've used soap with no issues, but the potential downside to soap is most are hygroscopic (absorb moisture from the air) and can can lead to rust in high humidity areas.
 

DuckBaloo

Senior member
Messages
282
Spud said:
Apparently using the wax from a wax toilet setting ring is supposed to be the best actually. Never tried it myself.

Makes sense, they are treated against contaminants, and $7 for a lifetime supply and a conversation piece, it just isn't as easy to store in my tool cabinet. I've used household candles plenty of times.
 
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