High fret on first fret

arealken

Senior member
Messages
226
I'm sorry for taxing the forum with my recent barrage of posts here, however I am really getting down to the end of setting up all my guitars and so there shouldn't be  more questions ...I'm not on lockdown or nothing, but have some time now. so therefore;
I really did a fine job if I do say so myself leveling the frets and crowning them, but when I strung the guitar up, the 'only' issue is on the first fret first string high E. It frets out, meaning I must have mowed that bit down too much relative to the adjacent fret.
It isn't a catastrophe per se, I can always get that one fret replaced , however I would like some advice on trying to spot level it.
If I use a fret rocker , and try and spot level, meaning  probably bringing down the 2nd fret to get the level,  will it create a domino effect on up the frets there, 3rd, 4th,  that could be more of a pain then just replacing the fret??
Thank you so much.
 

stratamania

Senior member
Messages
9,205
If it is as you describe being that the 1st fret is too low it will create a domino effect.  It might be easier to just replace it.
 

BigSteve22

Senior member
Messages
2,798
As stratamania said:
stratamania said:
If it is as you describe being that the 1st fret is too low it will create a domino effect.  It might be easier to just replace it.
However, did you verify that it's a low first fret that's causing the problem, rather that just a high spot on the second? That's the first thing I'd check, as it's a lot easier to correct, and a lot cheaper. Good luck!
 

stratamania

Senior member
Messages
9,205
BigSteve22 said:
As stratamania said:
stratamania said:
If it is as you describe being that the 1st fret is too low it will create a domino effect.  It might be easier to just replace it.
However, did you verify that it's a low first fret that's causing the problem, rather that just a high spot on the second? That's the first thing I'd check, as it's a lot easier to correct, and a lot cheaper. Good luck!

Yes definitely worth checking that. Also to what degree the differences are.

But if it is as bad as first described then all of the frets will end up maybe lower than preferable in which case a re fret would be in order.
 

arealken

Senior member
Messages
226
Thanks for the replies, very helpful.
I just found out checking the 1st fret with a rocker presents a problem because, well, there is nothing in front of it to reference. I might just take the 1st fret down a hair right there at the high E, to see if it helps, after all, its wack in that one place anyway, so its not as if I'd be screwing anything up.

EDIT- actually, using the fret rocker on the 1st through third frets, it does look as if the 2nd fret is high. I'll see if I can get that down there, wish me luck...worst case is I'll need two frets replaced. Thanks again.
 

Cagey

Senior member
Messages
24,425
That makes much more sense. It's kinda rare to find low frets unless they're just badly worn, which is usually physically obvious. Even then, they rarely occur in isolation - you'd likely see excess wear on adjacent frets as well, leading you to want to level the whole 'board.
 

PhilHill

Senior member
Messages
1,654
I have seen one or two situations where a fret will suddenly decide to rise up a little out of the board after a leveling has been done.
 
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