Review of new Warmoth neck, for first time buyers and semi-amateur builders

SeaGroomer

Senior member
Messages
206
I have only purchased one Warmoth neck, but my experience was completely different. Mine was the Warmoth headstock shape in modern construction, so it doesn't have the issues with string angles or anything compared to a strat headstock. The graphtech  nut seems just fine to me, but I admittedly have a hardtail so it's not really doing much lol. 

I really enjoy the feel of the '59 Roundback profile, I like a little chonk on my necks, and the stainless steel frets all seem nicely installed and there's no fret buzz. I had it assembled by a pro to make sure it was done right the first time since I'm a noob and it was too expensive to try and learn on.

The finish is nice and shiny, and it's a nice piece of walnut with an interesting knot it in that looks pretty cool. They used a flamey piece of walnut for the headstock, very snazzy. Overall I am very satisfied with it. My only request would be to offer more choices of dot inlay materials (specifically a green pearloid or malachite one.  :laughing3:)

 

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docteurseb

Senior member
Messages
743
The Warmoth installed nut that I received was (I hate to say it) not much more than a guide for the strings.
I've only ordered Warmoth necks with their pre-cut nuts twice and have been disappointed once (but it was still functional, just not what I expected given how much they charge for it).


Believe me, I did WAY more research than 99.99% of all people do on this.

Reading what you said right after that, I believe that number.

Problem is it really is true that "sometimes one just doesn't know what they like until they try stuff."
How much shoulders the neck profile has and how asymmetrical the profile is, all have as much (if not more) impact on how thick the neck feels.
If you look at the dimensions of the Wolgang, SRV, and 59 neck profiles from Warmoth you'd be tempted to think that Wolfgang will be way thinner than the other two... until you get it in your hands and find that it feels way chunkier.

Actually I personally find Warmoth's description of this profile being most similar to PRS' Pattern neck profile pretty much spot on. I think it's more accurate than expecting a 59-like LP neck profile.


I have done at least three OTS nuts on this and other guitars. Other than sanding them down for overall string height, slot width, etc (all of which are called out in the instructions and videos), nothing else.
No nut files or related.
YMMV.


It would be more fair to say you can quickly get a functional guitar using those pre-cut nuts and sandpaper only.
However, short of sheer luck and/or not being too picky, slot depth won't be optimal until you get those nut files they don't want you to know about.

Those instructions/videos are simple because they know the intended buyers don't have the experience and tools. I'm sure it'd be a great selling point for them to say 'and finally please pull your $50-$100 nut files for final adjustment'.


You'll most likely need to install at least one string tree. Even if you're using staggered height tuners.

After 19+ years ordering way more necks than I want to remember I never needed to install a string tree when using staggered tuners and a properly cut nut.
YMMV, I guess.
 

TheOtherEric

Active member
Messages
63
It's a fair review, but OP mainly just got a bit unlucky. Going sans-string-tree just doesn't always work, and different people are more/less sensitive to a little vibration back there.  Nut filing also has some randomness to it that even quality builders struggle with (I've had a Fender USA with bad nut, and a recent Suhr too). 

On my recent Warmoth neck, the nut is cut well enough that my Soloist (with Gotoh 510 trem) stays in tune far better than my similar Suhr. And I don't need a string tree.  I acknowledge there's some luck involved there. 

IMHO, the main criticism of Warmoth necks is all the fret work required -- like 3-4 hours for an amateur to level any high frets, file the sharp fret corners, roll the fretboard edges, then polish everything.  Musikraft does that for you; Warmoth does not. And these necks can't possibly be considered "great" until that's done. Today, Warmoth is like half the lead time, making it a better option for those of us with tooling and patience.

OP has also discovered how any criticism of Warmoth brings out the Faithful in full force to show how wrong he is. lol. Sorry OP.
 

docteurseb

Senior member
Messages
743
TheOtherEric said:
IMHO, the main criticism of Warmoth necks is all the fret work required -- like 3-4 hours for an amateur to level any high frets, file the sharp fret corners, roll the fretboard edges, then polish everything.  Musikraft does that for you; Warmoth does not.
I buy a lot of Musikraft necks (whenever I want curly maple because they are IMHO the better value there) and they do not level frets either.
It is true that their standard (free) edge treatment is noticeably better but it's not that heavily rolled to my taste (neither is their upcharge for heavily rolled fingerboard edges).
Overall, definitely a little more pleasing out of the box.

But if you want those nice heavily rolled fingerboard edges found on Tom Anderson or Fender Custom Shop Masterbuilt instruments there is sadly no substitute for those painful 3-4hours of work you'll be spending rolling fingerboard edges.


TheOtherEric said:
OP has also discovered how any criticism of Warmoth brings out the Faithful in full force to show how wrong he is. lol. Sorry OP.
While called Unofficial, it's still very much a Warmoth forum so that tends to happen no matter what ;-)

Hey I ordered two necks last year with LSR nut preparation, they were both DOA with the slot cut so low that the nut was still too low even with all the shims Fender provides...
Had to send both back and order a new one with regular nut, maybe I'll give it another try one day.
 

TheOtherEric

Active member
Messages
63
DrSeb said:
TheOtherEric said:
IMHO, the main criticism of Warmoth necks is all the fret work required -- like 3-4 hours for an amateur to level any high frets, file the sharp fret corners, roll the fretboard edges, then polish everything.  Musikraft does that for you; Warmoth does not.
I buy a lot of Musikraft necks (whenever I want curly maple because they are IMHO the better value there) and they do not level frets either...
Yes thank you, I should have been more careful with my wording. Musikraft doesn't level or polish the frets. They do round the fret ends (just barely) and roll the edges to my liking, though.  Which saves 2 hrs effort by the owner if you're slow like me.
 

Mx481james

Active member
Messages
69
ejm , I didn't read all the responses this may be covered already.
Warmoth 59 RB is like a 59 Les Paul , the Gibson neck that's real beefy is the 50's . I have one on my Gibson custom shop Les Paul Jr. It's a handful , actually use to love it . You may find after playing the 59 for a time it could change your preference ? It did me when I bought two collings with basically the 59 neck profile. Boy I thought I loved fat necks like 50 and boat . Wow after a 6  months of playing the 59's I'll never go back .
Really sorry to hear about your complaints . I was wondering if you contacted warmoth about them . I actually had two necks I didn't care for and they gave me a full refund no questions asked really. The company really stand's behind there product from my experience. 
 

TBurst Std

Senior member
Messages
2,589
Regarding neck profiles:
First I had a std neck. Too slim. Got a boatneck and loved it (while thin, my hands and fingers are easily long enough to roll over the thumb for a D/F# or A/C#. Trying a couple 59s now. So far so good. haven't lost speed or comfort and the necks are lighter in weight.

Thinner necks really cramp me up, especially on wide stretches.

Try this as an exercise:
Put your thumb against your palm. Now spread your fingers.
Now keep your thumb about 1/2 inch from your palm. Repeat.
Now keep your thumb 1 inch from you palm. Repeat

Don't know about you, but I get a MUCH wider and comfortable spread in my fingers as my thumb is further away from my palm.

I believe finding the right neck profile for you is maximizing that advantage without going larger than needed.

 

BroccoliRob

Senior member
Messages
880
bro how are u holding a neck that results in u pressing ur thumb toward your palm??? holding a neck (guitar) is more like a vice (but not exactly). my thumb taint never crunching down at my palm, that's wack yo
 

TBurst Std

Senior member
Messages
2,589
BroccoliRob said:
bro how are u holding a neck that results in u pressing ur thumb toward your palm??? holding a neck (guitar) is more like a vice (but not exactly). my thumb taint never crunching down at my palm, that's wack yo
It is merely an illustration. For a lot o people, the further the thumb is from the fingers (I said palm, my bad) the greater reach.
 
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