Opinion on gibson switch neck with 3/4 . nut width

tommyroland

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stratamania

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I assume you are asking about a Gibson conversion neck to give a 24 3/4" scale length with a 1 3/4" neck width.

This does not appear as an option in the builder but the website was recently updated. Check with Warmoth sales to see if it is possible. Contact details are at the bottom of the linked page.

https://warmoth.com/guitar-neck-scale-conversion
 

JohnnyHardtail

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359
I think he means 1.750" nut width.  I also find fractional measurements are very confusing and unfamiliar.
 

Rick

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4,539
I know it’s a crazy system ... an inch divided up by multiples of two and 8 which is a multiple of 4 ... then 12 inches to a foot ... 3 feet to the yard ... 6 feet to the fathom ...  1760 yards to the mile .. .  8 furlongs or 220 yards x 8 to the mile ...  jeesh!  Makes sense when you count two arms plus 10 fingers equals 12... sort of.

I don’t think warmoth makes such a thing.  Is that what your asking? I had Tacoma short scale years ago.  It had a wide neck. It was very playable
 

stratamania

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JohnnyHardtail said:
I think he means 1.750" nut width.  I also find fractional measurements are very confusing and unfamiliar.

Which is the same as 1 3/4" as I mentioned earlier as he used 3/4.

Traditionally fractional measurements are used with inches as they are imperial measurements and go together.

If you are unfamiliar it probably is confusing, but like anything if you are familiar with a system then it is not confusing.
 

NutBehindTheGuitar

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tommyroland said:
Hi, I was looking for a gibson switch neck with 3/4 nut width, but not listed as an option. Does anyone have experience with this?
Please be guided. I have previously purchased and used stock from Warmoth and loved it. Thanks!

Hi Tommy

Are you looking for a neck with a Gibson scale length of 24.75in (628.65mm) and a nut width of 1.75in (44mm) to go on an existing guitar that has the gibson scale neck of 24.75in (628.65mm)  and a smaller nut ? This would be called a replacement neck.

Or are you looking to replace the existing neck on an existing guitar that came with a Fender type scale 25.5in (647.7mm) with a neck that has the Gibson scale of 24.75in (628.65mm). That would be called a Conversion neck.

https://warmoth.com/guitar-neck-scale-conversion

Conversion necks are a Warmoth innovation that allow you to easily change the scale length of your 25-1/2" bolt-on guitar to either 24-3/4" (Gibson® length) or 28-5/8" (Baritone length). They work by lengthening or shortening the distance between the bridge saddles and the string nut, and offer an easy and inexpensive way to experience something new on your old Fender®.


 

JohnnyHardtail

Senior member
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359
stratamania said:
Which is the same as 1 3/4" as I mentioned earlier as he used 3/4.

Traditionally fractional measurements are used with inches as they are imperial measurements and go together.

If you are unfamiliar it probably is confusing, but like anything if you are familiar with a system then it is not confusing.

In regard to measurement system, is there any educational system around the world still teaches fractional measurements?
I thought anyone who went to school after about 1980, would have been taught in decimal system, perhaps even in the UK? 
It would only be the old folk who have a preference for fractions. 

When I receive my warmoth neck its normally states the nut width as 1.689".  I never saw it written as 1-353/512".



 

Rick

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4,539
As to using fractions or decimals just depends on the situation…. Ain’t no biggie where I live.  Gas is in decimals, but by the gallon.  Wine now is by the liter and milk is by the gallon but divided in quarts fourths, pints, cups etc.  one gets used to it.
 

stratamania

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9,481
JohnnyHardtail said:
stratamania said:
Which is the same as 1 3/4" as I mentioned earlier as he used 3/4.

Traditionally fractional measurements are used with inches as they are imperial measurements and go together.

If you are unfamiliar it probably is confusing, but like anything if you are familiar with a system then it is not confusing.

In regard to measurement system, is there any educational system around the world still teaches fractional measurements?
I thought anyone who went to school after about 1980, would have been taught in decimal system, perhaps even in the UK? 
It would only be the old folk who have a preference for fractions. 

When I receive my warmoth neck its normally states the nut width as 1.689".  I never saw it written as 1-353/512".

I am sure fractions etc are probably taught somewhere.

I left school prior to 1980 so I can not give you any first hand reference of what happened in the UK since then with regard to what is taught as a curriculum.  What I can tell you is I know both metric and imperial systems of weights and measurements etc. Also with regard to currency I also had to learn decimal and prior to that £,s,d which was pounds, shillings and pence which were still used till 1971 and how to convert between them.

1.689".  I never saw it written as 1-353/512"
was probably a 43mm or 1 11/16 neck that was sanded slightly smaller and measured with digital calipers set to inches and decimal.

The point is there are different systems in use and things get mixed and matched depending on context. So it is worth learning them in any case.

You might classify me as one of the "old folk" perhaps, perhaps not but I prefer metric and decimal but have no emotional attachment either way. But lets keep ageism intentional or not out of the forum.

I find the US can be an odd place that keeps using imperial measurements like inches and sells tools like drill bits in 7/64", sells wood as four quarter etc but then apparently people are taught metric and not the systems still in use. How does that work? 
 

JohnnyHardtail

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359
stratamania said:
The point is there are different systems in use and things get mixed and matched depending on context. So it is worth learning them in any case.

You might classify me as one of the "old folk" perhaps, perhaps not but I prefer metric and decimal but have no emotional attachment either way. But lets keep ageism intentional or not out of the forum.

I find the US can be an odd place that keeps using imperial measurements like inches and sells tools like drill bits in 7/64", sells wood as four quarter etc but then apparently people are taught metric and not the systems still in use. How does that work?

I agree with the points you made.  I have favoritism for decimal inches when it native to the engineering design, but I should not have made fuss about it.  I posted because I was interested in other people's views.  Thanks for your reply.
 
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