Grain filling the cut away

Patrick from Davis

Senior member
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2,197
Does any one have an easy way to sand this area on the side of the body?  For instance the cut away on a tele?  Do I grab the duct tape, sandpaper, and a little league baseball bat to get in there?  This grain filling thing has been going on for a while, I am starting to wonder if there is going to be anything but grain filling.
Patrick

 

jackthehack

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5,630
What are you grain filling? Get some of those sanding sponges/pads, they make those kind of areas easier to finish, not cheap, but they do the trick.
 

-CB-

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5,427
Patrick from Davis said:
This grain filling thing has been going on for a while, I am starting to wonder if there is going to be anything but grain filling.

Ah "this grain filling thing". 

Welcome to:  Guitar Finish 102 - Applied Elbow Grease

The sandpaper on a true dowel is a good choice.  So is sandpaper on a true cylinder, such as a straight sided (whatever).  Anything rounded that is smaller than the radius there - if you want to keep the edges really really true.    Or just use the pads that jack suggested, or tri-fold some sandpaper and have at it that way.

Depending on the finish you want....  you might want to consider the super glue method of filling.    Works well with translucent (transparent but colored) finishes, or solid colors.  Its a LOT faster than oil or water based fillers.  You put it down, sand it off (sands easy) and you're FILLed - except if you missed a spot.  No shrinkage, no 2nd application... I'm liking it.    My Mary Kaye tele will be resuming shortly, after my garage revamp is complete.  Almost done with the last of the shelving (wooohooo)..... then refit the radial arm saw, and use it to build up one last bench to work from (this time a rolling tool storage/workbench).
 

-CB-

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5,427
Me personally , only on ash.  And ash is at least as much of a pita to fill as mahogany.

To be honest, I filled with black, then brown, then superglue.  The black and brown were heavily sanded back, and allowed to remain only in the really deep stuff - for color enhancement.  The superglue was to make it smooth.

I dont see "a problem" with it on mahogany.  You can brown fill, sand back then smooth fill with superglue, if you're doing a clear finish. 

NOTE - superglue "can" blush if you apply it thick and its humid.  The trick is to work quickly in small places, apply it and smear it and let it go, keep working around till you have it all covered.  Dry for a day then sand it flat with a sanding block.  It sands great with 220 for the heavy level, then go back with 320 and you're ready to shoot the finish.
 

DangerousR6

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15,456
-CB- said:
Me personally , only on ash.  And ash is at least as much of a pita to fill as mahogany.

To be honest, I filled with black, then brown, then superglue.  The black and brown were heavily sanded back, and allowed to remain only in the really deep stuff - for color enhancement.  The superglue was to make it smooth.

I dont see "a problem" with it on mahogany.  You can brown fill, sand back then smooth fill with superglue, if you're doing a clear finish. 

NOTE - superglue "can" blush if you apply it thick and its humid.  The trick is to work quickly in small places, apply it and smear it and let it go, keep working around till you have it all covered.  Dry for a day then sand it flat with a sanding block.  It sands great with 220 for the heavy level, then go back with 320 and you're ready to shoot the finish.
Would the same super glue trick work on spalted maple?
 

Patrick from Davis

Senior member
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2,197
I am filling those long black korina grain gaps.  The cut away is more of an end grain job, but I couldn't really get in there with anything but bare paper.  I wasn't really keen on that.  I have seen how un-level that comes out before.  It took only 7 tries with the grain fill on the back of the body, uhg.  CB have you tried some of the slower curing CA that you can get from the remote control model building outlets?  I know the stuff dries hard, but I guess the sanding process with CA is not like grinding on epoxy.  I'll look into some of the tips that were listed.  Thanks again.
Patrick

 

-CB-

Senior member
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5,427
No, I've not tried it because:

It tends to go on thicker.  And it tends to blush.  And it tends to not fill as well as the water thin stuff.  The woodworkers seem to prefer the thin stuff, which also adds a bit of strength as it penetrates the fibres.
 
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